Dried Fruits

Sundried Tomatoes (UNSALTED, Organic), 8 oz

11
Sundried Tomatoes (UNSALTED, Organic), 8 oz
Order now, we'll ship tomorrow
  • 1 - 2 units - $6.29
    $6.29 / unit
  • 3 - 999 units - $5.66
    $5.66 / unit
Quantity

$6.29

 
Quantity Price
1 - 2 units. $6.29/unit
> 3 units. $5.66/unit
These taste awesome and are slightly sweet. These sun-dried tomatoes are very enjoyable right out of the bag. These make great sauces. Rehydrate these Organic Sun dried Tomatoes and they are great on pizza or in a salad. The tomatoes are sun dried, organic, and unsalted.

Origin: Argentina

You can make a quick tomato sauce with these and fresh tomatoes, onions, garlic and Italian spices, blended in food processor or blender.

  • A 100% vegetable product, Sundried Tomatoes contain no fat or no cholesterol and are naturally low in calories.
  • Sundried Tomatoes are a natural source of Vitamins C and iron. Vitamin C is a known antioxidant, which according to the National Cancer Institute, may help protect cells lowering the risk of cancer, diabetes, and heart and lung disease.
  • Contains lycopene, cited as reducing the risk of heart attack by as much as 50% in a November 1997 study published in the American Journal of Epidemiology.

    Did you know that tomatoes do not have to be a deep red color to be an outstanding source of lycopene? Lycopene is a carotenoid pigment that has long been associated with the deep red color of many tomatoes. A small preliminary study on healthy men and women has shown that the lycopene from orange- and tangerine-colored tomatoes may actually be better absorbed than the lycopene from red tomatoes. That's because the lycopene in deep red tomatoes is mostly trans-lycopene, and the lycopene in orange/tangerine tomatoes is mostly tetra-cis-lycopene. In a recent study, this tetra-cis form of lycopene turned out to be more efficiently absorbed by the study participants. While more research is needed in this area, we're encouraged to find that tomatoes may not have to be deep red in order for us to get great lycopene-related benefits.

    Tomatoes are widely known for their outstanding antioxidant content, including, of course, their oftentimes-rich concentration of lycopene. Researchers have recently found an important connection between lycopene, its antioxidant properties, and bone health. A study was designed in which tomato and other dietary sources of lycopene were removed from the diets of postmenopausal women for a period of 4 weeks, to see what effect lycopene restriction would have on bone health. At the end of 4 weeks, women in the study started to show increased signs of oxidative stress in their bones and unwanted changes in their bone tissue. The study investigators concluded that removal of lycopene-containing foods (including tomatoes) from the diet was likely to put women at increased risk of osteoporosis. They also argued for the importance of tomatoes and other lycopene-containing foods in the diet. We don't always think about antioxidant protection as being important for bone health, but it is, and tomato lycopene (and other tomato antioxidants) may have a special role to play in this area.

    There are literally hundreds of different tomato varieties. We usually choose our favorite varieties by some combination of flavor, texture, and appearance. But a recent study has shown that we may also want to include antioxidant capacity as a factor when we are choosing among tomato varieties. Surprisingly, researchers who compared conventionally grown versus organically grown tomatoes found that growing method (conventional versus organic) made less of an overall difference than variety of tomato. While all tomatoes showed good antioxidant capacity, and while the differences were not huge, the following four varieties of tomatoes turned out to have a higher average antioxidant capacity regardless of whether they were grown conventionally or organically: New Girl, Jet Star, Fantastic, and First Lady. It's only one study, of course, and we're definitely not ready to recommend these four varieties at the exclusion of all others. But these findings are fascinating to us, and they suggest that specific types of nutrient benefits may be provided by specific varieties of tomatoes. Also, if you're seeking good antioxidant protection and you're in the grocery standing in front of a New Girl, Jet Star, Fantastic, or First Lady tomato, you would probably be well-served to place it in your shopping cart.

    Intake of tomatoes has long been linked to heart health. Fresh tomatoes and tomato extracts have been shown to help lower total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, and triglycerides. In addition, tomato extracts have been shown to help prevent unwanted clumping together (aggregation) of platelet cells in the blood - a factor that is especially important in lowering risk of heart problems like atherosclerosis. (In a recent South American study of 26 vegetables, tomatoes and green beans came out best in their anti-aggregation properties.) But only recently are researchers beginning to identify some of the more unusual phytonutrients in tomatoes that help provide us with these heart-protective benefits. One of these phytonutrients is a glycoside called esculeoside A; another is flavonoid called chalconaringenin; and yet another is a fatty-acid type molecule called 9-oxo-octadecadienoic acid. As our knowledge of unique tomato phytonutrients expands, we are likely to learn more about the unique role played by tomatoes in support of heart health. Tomatoes are also likely to rise further and further toward the top of the list as heart healthy foods.
  • These statements have not been evaluated by the FDA. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease.
    * Email:
    Country:
    State:

    Subscribe to our newsletter